China to account for 20 per cent of world’s aircraft demand over next two decades – Business Traveller

Boeing has published its latest forecast for commercial aircraft demand in China, with a total of 8,560 aircraft set to be delivered to the country between now and 2042.

The manufacturer said that the 20-year demand was being driven by China’s fast-growing domestic air travel, as well as “economic growth well above the global average”.

The figure means that China will account for 20 per cent of all commercial aircraft deliveries over the next two decades.

Fleet growth is set to drive two thirds of deliveries over the period, with the country’s airlines set to double their fleets to nearly 9,600 jets over the next 20 years.

Single aisle aircraft will make up the bulk of the deliveries, with China set to welcome 6,470 new single aisle planes between now and 2042. The rest of the forecasted total is made up of 1,550 widebody aircraft, 350 regional jets, and 190 freighter aircraft.

Boeing also highlighted that China will require 433,000 new aviation personnel – including 161,000 cabin crew members – to serve its growing market.

The forecast comes as Boeing celebrates its 50th year of aircraft service in China, with the first 707 aircraft being delivered to the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) in 1973.

Commenting on the news Darren Hulst, Boeing vice president, commercial marketing, said:

“Domestic air traffic in China has already surpassed pre-pandemic levels and international traffic is recovering steadily.

“As China’s economy and traffic continue to grow, Boeing’s complete line-up of commercial jets will play a key role in helping meet that growth sustainably and economically.”

Earlier this month IATA released its latest traffic figures, showing that global airline passenger traffic had surpassed 95 per cent of pre-Covid levels in July – “strongly supported by surging demand in the China domestic market”.

Global airline passenger traffic surpassed 95 per cent of pre-Covid levels in July

boeing.com



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